The breakout star of Netflix’s hit ‘Indian Matchmaking’ is a hilarious, and stubborn Houston lawyer

It might seem strange to invoke an Alice Walker essay in connection with the new Netflix reality series, Indian Matchmaking , but, here we go. The essay is revolutionary for that coinage. Walker explicitly draws a connection between skin color and marriage. Walker tells us two smaller, adjoining stories, about herself and a friend in their single days. In the Netflix series Indian Matchmaking , the importance of skin color arrives quickly in talk of matrimony, as do other facets of packaged appearance, the sorts that indicate a notion of a stratified universe: This level of education matches with this one, this shade of skin with this, this height with this, these family values with these, this caste with this, this region with this, and so on. In the series, she takes on clients in India and America, young desi men and women who seem, for all their desire to get properly paired off, equally conflicted about the whole endeavor. The women work and travel; they like their lives and have friends who offer the sort of support a spouse might. All seem to want, at some level, simple, non-transactional, unconditional affection. At the same time, they talk in transactional terms. The series leaves us with a somewhat haunting vision, an echo of a refrain repeated throughout the show, but one that lands louder with our final subject.

How the reality show ‘Indian Matchmaking’ hides the reality

Indian Matchmaking unpacks only selectively what an upper-class, upper-caste Indian marriage entails. All of it costs, moneh, honeh. Oodles of it.

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I was reporting a feature on India’s $​billion marriage-industrial complex — which includes.

I was on the phone with my mother, who lives in Pune, India, complaining about Indian Matchmaking , when she brought up the marriage proposal. I knew she agreed. I scoffed. But watch Indian Matchmaking , and you may end the eight-episode arc of the smartly edited, highly bingeable show with a misleading idea of how arranged marriages actually work.

The Netflix reality show follows Sima Taparia, a matchmaker from Mumbai whose pen-and-paper spreadsheets of potential suitors is far from the most outdated thing about her. She flies back and forth between the U. Women need to cook. Men need to provide. Most women who hire Taparia on Indian Matchmaking are accomplished professionals with hobbies and a social life. And every one of them is told to compromise and adjust expectations.

To western audiences, the show depicts a “progressive” style of matchmaking that is much more palatable than the sometimes viciously misogynist and purely transactional matchmaking practiced among most Indians. But what becomes clear while watching the show is that while the means of matchmaking have been updated, the system itself remains brutal for the women involved.

Perhaps not physically so, like it is for so many Indian women and girls, but certainly mentally and emotionally. If the real Indian matchmaking process was presented without the trappings of wealth, the series would come off as a human rights documentary.

Meet someone for keeps

When Indian Matchmaking aired on Netflix, the Internet immediately exploded with theories, questions and memes about its participants. The show followed Sima Taparia, a matchmaker from Mumbai, as she tried to find matches for her clients – one of them being Pradhyuman Maloo. Pradhyuman, a jewellery designer from Mumbai, has now opened up about his experience of participating in Indian Matchmaking and how the Netflix show raised questions about his sexuality in an interview with ‘ Humans of Bombay ‘.

Consisting an easy to binge-watch eight episodes, the show follows Mumbai’s self-confessed “best matchmaker” Sima Taparia as she weighs up.

Weddings may be delayed, but matchmaking is as busy as ever. So where did Ankita Bansal , the modern business woman, end up after having met not one, but two, matchmakers? There was Akshay Jakhete and then there was his mother, who blamed her rising blood pressure on Akshay’s slow journey to marriage. However, Akshay is feeling lighter post split. I feel so free. The men I went on dates with are who I really call my friends today. And for me, that’s so special because we got to walk away with these friendships and that’s priceless.

I was looking down to settle down a little bit and we had differences in terms of distance. When audiences last saw Vyasar Ganesan , the quirky Texas teacher was hopeful about his future with Rashi Gupta.

Indian Matchmaking: The ‘cringe-worthy’ Netflix show that is a huge hit

These men and women — or boys and girls, as they are referred to in Indian society, perhaps to reinforce their youth and innocence — of Indian origin are in their 20s and 30s, living in India and the US. Credit: Netflix. Indian Matchmaking just takes this concept further. Of course, each of these comes with their own good, bad and ugly. I think the entire experience felt like going on a journey with no idea as to what could turn up next. There have always been matchmakers and, more recently, marriage agencies that connected families.

The Netflix reality series Indian Matchmaking has been a viral hit, but mostly because people are talking about the controversies around it.

Ketaki Desai and Sonam Joshi. Naina Hiranandani, co-founder of matchmaking service Sirf Coffee, says that dietary preferences have become very important to people. What are you going to do, check his stools every day? Dating coach Simran Mangharam has also noticed this trend. Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community.

Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive. Let’s work together to keep the conversation civil. In violence that followed the arrest of Dera Sach Sauda chief in , cases were filed in Panckhula, yet there has not been a conviction so far. Pyjama living seems to be losing its novelty as Instagram challenges and dress-up days revive interest in fashion.

The virus may not be making kids very sick but staying cooped up inside is taking a toll on their mental health. According to data released by a private lab, a fifth of India’s population may have already had a brush with coronavirus. During the Covid pandemic, the language bias became all the more obvious, so translators set out to fix this. In China, suddenly people have begun to watch a lot of Indian videos on weddings, Bollywood — Madhuri remains a favourite, and kulfi.

‘Indian Matchmaking’ producer reacts to row over Netflix show: ‘All perspectives are valid’

CNN Smriti Mundhra is not at all bothered that people are talking about colorism, sexism and elitism when it comes to “Indian Matchmaking. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. More Videos Why the Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is causing a stir

India · Revenue in the Matchmaking segment is projected to reach US$m in · Revenue is expected to show an annual growth rate (CAGR ) of.

Coronavirus: How Covid has changed the ‘big fat Indian wedding’. India’s richest family caps year of big fat weddings. A new Netflix show, Indian Matchmaking, has created a huge buzz in India, but many can’t seem to agree if it is regressive and cringe-worthy or honest and realistic, writes the BBC’s Geeta Pandey in Delhi. The eight-part docuseries features elite Indian matchmaker Sima Taparia as she goes about trying to find suitable matches for her wealthy clients in India and the US.

In the series, she’s seen jet-setting around Delhi, Mumbai and several American cities, meeting prospective brides and grooms to find out what they are looking for in a life partner. Since its release nearly two weeks back, Indian Matchmaking has raced to the top of the charts for Netflix in India. It has also become a massive social phenomenon.

Indian Matchmaking, Total Recall, and the best things we watched this weekend

I can give her…95 marks out of It is reflective, sometimes painfully, of a custom with which we are all too familiar: arranged marriages. For desis, either your parents were arranged or you know a couple that was.

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ Is The Talk Of India — And Not In A Good Way. Facebook; Twitter; Flipboard; Email.

Based on criteria they provide, clients are matched with ostensibly compatible dates, but they soon find that the goal of marriage is more difficult to attain that they had hoped — even with a matchmaker who consults biological data profiles, astrologers and face readers. Listen Listening Does the addictively bingeable series provide an accurate look at the process of arranged marriage for Indians and Indian Americans in ?

Indians living in India approach marriage and dating differently than Indians living in the U. And Indians who have emigrated to the U. The point is: there is no unilateral approach. Manisha Dass also notes the diversity. There’s major differences in how people think about dating in the generations before me and definitely location as well. Income, education, profession, region, religion, parentage and skin color can all be deterrents when it comes to finding a suitable match.

People will say, like: Oh no, you don’t fit one caste or the other. And I’m glad that the show didn’t shy away from them.

Sima Taparia of ‘Indian Matchmaking’ on family dynamics, ghosting and failed matches

Core country: data based on in-depth analysis. Reading Support The Matchmaking segment is expected to show a revenue growth of Reading Support In the Matchmaking segment, the number of users is expected to amount to

Ever since Netflix featured the series Indian Matchmaking, Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia has become a global name.

Critics accuse the show of stereotyping and commodifying women, lacking diversity and promoting a backwards vision of marriage where astrologers and meddling parents are more influential than the preferences of brides and grooms. They complain that the series, which follows matchmaker Sima Taparia as she jets between Mumbai and the U. In fact, the real problem may be their discomfort with the way marriage works in India, with social stability prized over individual happiness.

A small fraction still practices child marriage, with some communities holding betrothal ceremonies as soon as a girl is born. At the other end of the spectrum, there is growing acceptance of queer relationships, divorce and even avoiding marriage altogether. But most Indian marriages are still arranged. Even college-educated, urban, middle-class Indians show a strong preference to marry within caste. Muslims in South Asia marry within their biradari or jaat — a stand-in for Hindu caste.

Funniest Indian matrimonial videos ever